6.11.4 Compiler options

The menu ”Options—Compiler” allow the settting of options that affect the compilers behaviour. When this menu item is chosen, a dialog pops up that displays several tabs.

There are six tabs:

Syntax
Here options can be set that affect the various syntax aspects of the code. They correspond mostly to the -S option on the command line (section 5.1.5, page 105).
Code generation
These options control the generated code; they are mostly concerned with the -C and -X command line options.
Verbose
These set the verbosity of the compiler when compiling. The messages of the compiler are shown in the compiler messages window (can be called with F12).
Browser
Options concerning the generated browser information. Browser information needs to be generated for the symbol browser to work.
Assembler
Options concerning the reading of assembler blocks (-R on the command line) and the generated assembler (-A on the command line)
Processor
Here the target processor can be selected.

On each tab page, there are two entry boxes: the first for Conditional defines and the second for additional compiler arguments. The symbols, and arguments, should be separated with semi-colons.

The syntax tab of the compiler options dialog is shown in figure (6.23).



Figure 6.23: The syntax options tab

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In the syntax options dialog, the following options can be set:

Stop after first error
when checked, the compiler stops after the first error. Normally the compiler continues compiling till a fatal error is reached. (-Se (see page 5.1.5) on the command line)
Allow label and goto
Allow the use of label declarations and goto statements (-Sg (see page 5.1.5) on the command line).
Enable macros
Allow the use of macros (-Sm (see page 5.1.5)).
Allow inline
Allow the use of inlined functions (-Sc (see page 5.1.5) on the command line).
Include assertion code
Include Assert statements in the code.
Load kylix compat. unit
Load the Kylix compatibility unit.
Allow STATIC in objects
Allow the Static modifier for object methods (-St (see page 5.1.5) on the command line)
C-like operators
Allows the use of some extended operators such as +=, -= etc. (-Sc (see page 5.1.5) on the command line).
Compiler mode
select the appropriate compiler mode:
Free Pascal Dialect
The default Free Pascal compiler mode (FPC).
Object pascal extensions on
Enables the use of classes and exceptions (-Sd (see page 5.1.5) on the command line).
Turbo pascal compatible
Try to be more Turbo Pascal compatible (-So (see page 5.1.5) on the command line).
Delphi compatible
Try to be more Delphicompatible (-Sd (see page 5.1.5) on the command line).
Macintosh Pascal dialect
Try to be Macintosh pascal compatible.

The code generation tab of the compiler options dialog is shown in figure (6.24).



Figure 6.24: The code generation options tab

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In the code generation dialog, the following options can be set:

Run-time checks
Controls what run-time checking code is generated. If such a check fails, a run-time error is generated. The following checking code can be generated:
Range checking
Checks the results of enumeration and subset type operations (-Cr (see page 5.1.4) command line option).
Stack checking
Checks whether the stack limit is not reached (-Cs (see page 5.1.4) command line option).
I/O checking
Checks the result of IO operations (-Ci (see page 5.1.4) command line option).
Integer overflow checking
Checks the result of integer operations (-Co (see page 5.1.4) command line option).
Object method call checking
Check the validity of the method pointer prior to calling it.
Position independent code
Generate PIC code.
Create smartlinkable units
Create smartlinkable units.
Optimizations
What optimizations should be used when compiling:
Generate faster code
Corresponds to the -OG command line option.
Generate smaller code
Corresponds to the -Og command line option.

More information on these switches can be found in section 5.1.4, page 98.

The processor tab of the compiler options dialog is shown in figure (6.25).

In the processor dialog, the target processor can be set. The compiler can use different optimizations for different processors.



Figure 6.25: The processor selection tab

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The verbose tab of the compiler options dialog is shown in figure (6.26).



Figure 6.26: The verbosity options tab

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In this dialog, the following verbosity options can be set (on the command line: -v (see page 5.1.2)):

Warnings
Generate warnings. Corresponds to -vw on the command line.
Notes
Generate notes. Corresponds to -vn on the command line.
Hints
Generate hints. Corresponds to -vh on the command line.
General info
Generate general information. Corresponds to -vi on the command line.
User,tried info
Generate information on used and tried files. Corresponds to -vut on the command line.
All
Switch on full verbosity. Corresponds to -va on the command line.
Show all procedures if error
If an error using overloaded procedure occurs, show all procedures. Corresponds to -vb on the command line.

The browser tab of the compiler options dialog is shown in figure (6.27).



Figure 6.27: The browser options tab

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In this dialog, the browser options can be set:

No browser
(default) No browser information is generated by the compiler.
Only global browser
Browser information is generated for global symbols only, i.e. symbols defined not in a procedure or function (-b on the command line)
Local and global browser
Browser information is generated for all symbols, i.e. also for symbols that are defined in procedures or functions (-bl on the command line)

Remark: If no browser information is generated, the symbol browser of the IDE will not work.

The assembler tab of the compiler options dialog is shown in figure (6.28). The actual dialog may vary, as it depends on the target CPU the IDE was compiled for.



Figure 6.28: The assembler options tab

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In this dialog, the assembler reader and writer options can be set:

Assembler reader
This permits setting the style of the assembler blocks in the sources:
AT&T assembler
The assembler is written in AT&T style assembler (-Ratt on the command line).
Intel style assembler
The assembler is written in Intel style assembler blocks (-Rintel on the command line).

remark that this option is global, but locally the assembler style can be changed with compiler directives.

Assembler info
When writing assembler files, this option decides which extra information is written to the assembler file in comments:
List source
The source lines are written to the assembler files together with the generated assembler (-al on the command line).
List register allocation
The compiler’s internal register allocation/deallocation information is written to the assembler file (-ar on the command line).
List temp allocation
The temporary register allocation/deallocation is written to the assembler file. (-at on the command line).
List node allocation
The node allocation/deallocation is written to the assembler file. (-an on the command line).
use pipe with assembler
use a pipe on unix systems when feeding the assembler code to an external assembler.

The latter three of these options are mainly useful for debugging the compiler itself, it should rarely be necessary to use these.

Assembler output
This option tells the compiler what assembler output should be generated.
Use default output
This depends on the target.
Use GNU as
Assemble using gnu as (-Aas on the command line).
Use NASM coff
Produce NASM coff assembler (go32v2, -Anasmcoff on the command line)
Use NASM elf
Produce NASM elf assembler (linux, -Anasmelf on the command line).
Use NASM obj
Produce NASM obj assembler (-Anasmobj on the command line).
Use MASM
Produce MASM (Microsoft assembler) assembler (-Amasm on the command line).
Use TASM
Produce TASM (Turbo Assembler) assembler (-Atasm on the command line).
Use coff
Write binary coff files directly using the internal assembler (go32v2, -Acoff on the command line).
Use pecoff
Write binary pecoff files files directly using the internal writer. (Win32)